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      architecture-drawings:

      Adam Simpson 

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      distophoria:

      ART: Mats Bakken

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      archatlas:

      Disintegrating II Fabian Oefner

      From the artist:

      “Disintegrating Series” is a suite of photographs of high performance cars that appear to have blown apart. The series explores essential questions abut the relationship of time and reality, ultimately creating a visually rich rendition of a moment that never existed.

      Three years after the release of the first set, Oefner has created five additional photographs. Each one representing a staggering amount of time, dedication and attention to detail. Have a look at the video below to find out about the artist`s process.

      Images and text via Fabian Oefner

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      fuckyeahbrutalism:

      Villa at Cologny, Geneva, Switzerland, 1962

      (Georges Bréra)

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      yamino:

      image

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      faithistorment:

      Lego Brutalist and Modernist Buildings by Arndt Schlaudraff

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      megadeluxe:

      by markfatlace http://ift.tt/1BQY65q

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      lemanoosh:

      http://www.sportkb.com/razvodka-glushitelya/

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      dubeton:

      http://marcwilson.co.uk/albums

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      shamewave:

      Camille Pajot

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      cryism:

      autonomeme:

      But y’all have to see this comment

      This is so #me wow





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      wyrdoldetippe:

      New Boss on Construction Sites Is a Drone | MIT Technology Review

      For some construction workers, any thoughts of slacking off could soon seem rather quaint. The drones will almost certainly notice.

      The workers building a lavish new downtown stadium for the Sacramento Kings in California are being monitored by drones and software that can automatically flag slow progress.

      Once per day, several drones automatically patrol the Sacramento work site, collecting video footage. That footage is then converted into a three-dimensional picture of the site, which is fed into software that compares it to computerized architectural plans as well as a the construction work plan showing when each element should be finished. The software can show managers how the project is progressing, and can automatically highlight parts that may be falling behind schedule.

      Such additional scrutiny is controversial. It raises worries over worker privacy, for instance, and fears that people may be encouraged to work excessive hours.

      Golparvar-Fard concedes that this could be an issue, but he defends the idea. “It’s not new to the construction industry that there would either be people standing and observing operations, or that there would be fixed cameras,” he says. “Yes, making this autonomous has a different feeling for the workers. But you have to keep in mind that it’s not really questioning the efficiency of the workers, it’s questioning what resources these guys need to be more efficient.”

      yikes